Questions

Some of the questions we are pursuing answers to are:

Breeding:
1. What is the food availability for breeding insectivorous birds at north temperate, tropical and south temperate latitudes, and how is that related to their behavior and ecology?
2. How long does the breeding season last at north temperate, south temperate and tropical latitudes, and how is that related to life history strategies such as clutch size, nestling growth and timing of migration?
3. How are migratory strategies (e.g., speed and timing of migration) related to breeding strategies (timing, clutch size) across different latitudes?

Migration:

1. How do strategies used during migration carry over to events in the breeding season (nest success, nestling growth) at north temperate, tropical and south temperate latitudes? If populations that breed at lower latitudes have more time to breed, does that affect how they migrate to those latitudes to breed, relative to those at higher latitudes?
2. Is migration a risky time of year for migratory birds and does this vary among populations that breed at north temperate, tropical and south temperate latitudes?

Winter:

We study the winter ecology of Fork-tailed Flycatchers (T. savana) in northern South America (Colombia and Venezuela), where the non-breeding season coincides with the rainy season. In contrast, many Nearctic-Neotropical migrants spend the non-breeding season in the Neotropics during the dry season there. Does this lead to different pressures on these species in terms of physiological condition, survival, and molt strategies during the non-breeding season, and migration strategies in spring?

 

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